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Substrates – examples of industry solutions

Cattle and pig:Substrate Kuh
slurry is high in energy and can often easily be fed into a biogas application. After the digestion to obtain energy, the substrate is available as the optimum manure virtually odour-free. Both liquid slurry and solids (e.g. cattle dung) can be used depending on animal housing. Cattle and pig slurry is also ideal as a co-substrate for solids.



 

 


Poultry:Substrate Huhn
Poultry dung and faeces have a high biogas potential and can thus ensure the high energy consumption (electricity and heat) required to operate the livestock buildings. The dry substance content of the faeces varies depending on the type of husbandry and feeding of the animals; therefore project planning and process design are performed individually. Intensive laboratory testing and experience in various projects mean that comprehensive experience has been gained with these demanding substrates which is of great benefit.
 

 



Waste from food production:Substrate Reste
The waste and byproducts occurring in the various cultivation and processing stages are well suited to biogas production. The materials generally have a dry substance content of 10 – 50 % and are frequently highly homogenous due to the mainly industrial processing; they can thus easily be integrated in a substrate mix. Numerous projects in various industries (supermarkets, breweries, wine production etc.) have already been planned leading to comprehensive knowledge of the substrates.

 


Maize, sorghum:Substrate Mais
In the cultivation areas, substrates can be produced at very low cost due to the fertile soil and favourable cultivation conditions. These favourable preconditions mean that many operations can secure high yields for energy production as part of cultivation planning with little effort required.  One example of this is growing maize after the soya harvest. The energy can be used directly on site in the form of electricity, heat or gas or be sold on the energy market depending on the structure and complexity of the operations.